Steve Chaconas

Question
Hi Capt. Steve
I want to use the Sting Ray grubs on the Potomac, and I wanted more info. I googled and found a 2008 Bassmaster article by Darl Black that was all you and your using them. But you say use a Gerkin jig head, but they may be out of business. What do you recommend?


Fred
Answer
Hi Fred
Mann's Stingray is one of my favorite oldie but goodies that I have been using since the mid 1960s! I use a standard 1/4 ounce ball head jig head that I make. I will either paint or powdercoat the head black. I use a Mustad Ultra Point hook. Or you and just get a nice quality head with a decent keeper. One more tip, keep the baits in your pocket to keep them warm before you thread onto the hook. When cold, they sometimes will split when going onto a keeper barb!
Capt. Steve
 

Question
Hi Capt. Steve
Fan of your newsletters, videos and have greatly appreciated your replies in the past. Question regarding tidal flow, (majority of my fishing on lakes). Fish tidal water once or twice a year. Let¿say wind not a factor, say 3¿ differential. Low tide at 9 a.m., high tide at 3:00 p.m. When is the greatest or fastest flow? I would guess right in the middle.


John
Answer
Hi John
Tidal flow is highest at the beginning of the outgoing tide! Unless the wind is blowing against it. Likewise. Tides with a following wind will gain momentum. Usually tides changing from slack will trigger bites as the change in current causes boat fish to move around a bit initially. Stronger current activates baitfish swimming harder in current.

It's not a very easily predicted variable! Putting a few days together and watching current in your location noting accompanying or opposing winds will enable you to "predict" from one day to the next. Actually seeing grass float by or bend over is a good indicator.

Another factor will be rainfall or flooding either up river or below river. Knowing this will also indicate how much water is flowing to increase current. There are monitors you can find on-line, but you need to match them up with tide charts and wind.

To confuse matters more, this varies on the 63 mile stretch of the Tidal Potomac bass fishery.

Good question!
Capt. Steve
 

Question
Bass Fishing Expert:,
Steve.. My question concerns plastic baits you know the ones you find in the bottom of your tackle box. Do they go bad? Can you tell me the life span of plain, salted,gulp plastics. Thank you for your response. Joe Shmokler
Joseph
Answer
Joseph,
Hi Joseph,

Good question. Before I answer, I have to encourage you to go through your tackle from time to time to inventory what you have, what you use and what you might need. After that, take a look at your soft plastics. Let's start with GULP type baits. If these have been kept moist in a sealed bag, they are probably still effective. But once they dry out and get hard, you might try spraying the GULP refresher! This should bring them back to life. If the bags are not sealed, they will dry out! Try using BAGGIE FREEZER bags! They hold up well to the chemicals that might eat up other similar baggies. Next are the salted baits. These should be fine as long as they didn't get too wet! The salt is impregnated in the plastic but will leach out when wet! Again, pack these in better bags and shake some course sea salt into the bag.

As for the plain old soft plastic baits, They are usually fine! I use a bait spray called Jack's Juice. I spray this into the bag and it soaks into the plastic and the scent soaks in! As long as these baits haven't come into contact with your hard baits, like crankbaits or spinnerbait skirts, they should be fine! When contacting crankbaits or skirts, some soft plastics experience a chemical reaction and the baits melt!

The best thing to do with your soft baits is to use them! But it's hard if they are hidden in the bottom of your box! Good luck!
Capt. Steve
 

Question
Hi Capt. Steve
When should I use a 4 inch Senko over 5 inch size?
Alan
Answer
Hi Alan
Great question! First, there is a huge difference in fall rate and action. Obviously the 5 inched falls faster, a key in deeper water or when fish are reacting to moving lures. The 4 inch bait is perfect for clear water during the summer when there is a ton of bait. But also, the 5 inch bait has a lot more action! The bait will shimmy more and entice more bites. I like to rig them Texas style with a 3/0 Mustad Mega Bite hook, but wacky rigging is also very popular and effective! Use an O-Ring and a wacky rig hook. Mustad makes red hooks and one comes with a weedguard. I use the 2/0 size for that style and the smaller Octopus hook.

If I could only have one of these boats, it would be the 5 inch as it has a lot more range. But the days when fishing is toughest, try the 4 inch size.
Capt. Steve
 

Question
Hi Capt. Steve
I am starting to look at fishing shaky heads. What do you use?
Jason
Answer
Hi Jason
One with a good hook! I use 1/8 ounce heads I pour. I use Mustad 3/0 long Ultra Point hooks. Spot Sticker makes a good one. I really need to try some of the ones with a corkscrew keeper. Punisher makes a good one. 4.5 inch worms. I pour mine junebug, with a blue red flake laminate.
I wrote an article about 5 years ago, but never really played with it. Wasn't sure my clients could deal with it. But when that's all they are biting, I'm on it. In very shallow water, go even lighter!
Just make sure you use 6-8 pound test and don't overset! Just reel, load and pull while reeling!
Capt. Steve
 

Submit Your Question