Repairs & Maintenance

Subject
Topic: Overheating - 2000 Johnson 130 VXSSS
'bout time
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Joined: 11 July 2004
Location: South Carolina
Posts: 184
Posted: 21 July 2004 at 6:46pm | IP Logged
My friend has a 2000 Johnson 130 on a 19 ft SeaPro and he constantly has problems with overheating.  This seems to occur everytime after even a slight brush with sandy bottoms in the river he runs, even at idle speed.  I realize that the obvious fix would for him not to brush the bottom, however, I run the same shallow river, first with a 1996 Johnson 115, and now with a Yamaha 150, and have never had a problem.  He has had it in for service several times and simply gets told that "we just had to clean it out".  This will work for awhile, then the problem will re-occur.  Does anyone know if this is a problem typical of this outboard and/or any possible solutions?
Mud Runner
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Joined: 31 May 2004
Location: Virginia Beach, Va
Posts: 740
Posted: 21 July 2004 at 7:59pm | IP Logged
Take a look at the two engines.  If his is a 60 degree block, it's an engine built with the lost foam casting method and the thermostats are at the top each cylinder bank.  Those thermostats are plastic and have a habit of sticking.  Now add sand or mud and it only gets worse.   Those thermostats should be changed more often.  Your engine may be a 90 degree which to totally different.  The 115 hp was manufactured in both 6 & 90 degree.  One thing that I found with my 60 degree engine was that alot of times you had to pump the throttle in neutral to pop the thermostats open.  Once I did that I could see the temperature go down. 
'bout time
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Joined: 11 July 2004
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Posted: 21 July 2004 at 10:04pm | IP Logged

Thanks for the feedback.  Your answer is exactly how fixed my 115 once when it ran hot.  I am forwarding this to my non BoatUS friend.  I know he will ask this (because I would ask this)...how does a non-mechanically educated fellow determine whether it is a 60 or 90 degree block?

 

Mud Runner
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Posted: 22 July 2004 at 6:33am | IP Logged
The distance between the cylinder banks is greater(wider) on the 90 degree.  Also the thermostat cover on the 60 degree on top of each cylinder bank is plastic with a hex shape so you can remove it with a socket set.  The carburetor baffle on the 60 degree is easily removed with rubber hold downs and is made of plastic.  Finally all you have to do is look at the cover of the engine and you'll see the difference right away.  The 60 degree is slimmer by a mile.
'bout time
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Posted: 22 July 2004 at 7:28pm | IP Logged
Thanks, Mud Runner.  I have passed your words of wisdom on.
Grady23
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Joined: 08 October 2003
Location: Mt. Airy, Maryland
Posts: 607
Posted: 22 July 2004 at 7:36pm | IP Logged
You might tell your friend to consider adding a cutoff pitchfork to the lower unt. Cut the tines off at the top of the metal and use a couple of large hose clamps to attach it. I know guys that use this to avoid hitting rocks as it cause the motor to raise up when the tines hit the rock first. It might work with the sandy bottom if he makes up a small plow shaped attachment to weld on to the center tine. It looks funky but it works.

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