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Topic: Marina Etiquette Tips
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Presentation
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Posted: 13 March 2007 at 4:41pm | IP Logged

Marina Etiquette Tips

Based on personal experience and observation I have come up with the below list of etiquette tips for getting along at the marina. If you have additional suggestions please add them.

- At areas where multiple boaters need to use the same location like the gas dock, waste pump-out station or launch ramp, do what you need to do then move your boat. If you need to go to the bathroom, talk to another person or purchase some supplies do this after you have vacated these areas.

- Keep dock lines, water hoses, power cords and other such items neatly coiled and placed in such a way that they are not a tripping hazard or mess to other people using the docks.

- If itís a windy day or tight quarters itís considered polite to help another boater dock. Normally this means someone that is docking within a couple of slips from where you are. This often requires nothing more then holding a line if tossed to you until a person form the boat is able to tie it off the way they prefer.

- Obey no wake inside any marina with plenty to spare. If you are going to error, error on the side of going too slow.

- If you are tying up along a guest seawall do so in such a manor that your boat does not hog more room then it should. If there is a 60 foot wall and you have a 28 foot boat donít take your 28 feet out of the middle. Pick one side or the other.

- Along a sea wall use a spring line in each direction so your boat does not move in either direction causing your boat to hit another boat.

- Turn your VHF radio to LOW power so if you make a call when close to other boats you do not damage other boaterís radios.

- Do not use the VHF radio for boat to land based communications unless it is with a licensed shore station like the marina itself. Not only does this clutter the airways its illegal per the FCC. Use a family frequency hand held or cell phone for this purpose.

- Keep music / TV volume at a reasonable level. Sound travels very well over the water. Keep this in mind when talking too.

- Keep your kids off other peopleís boats and under reasonable control. Donít let them grab and play with other boaterís water lines, dock lines, etc.

- Respect quiet hours. This varies marina to marina. Mostly I see this posted as after 11:00PM but varies from marina to marina so check.

- Return dock carts to their proper location when finished using.
Edited by Presentation on 13 March 2007 at 4:42pm
millsan1
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Posted: 14 March 2007 at 1:31am | IP Logged

Thank you for posting this.  For a newbie like me, they come in handy.

My Summation:

Do unto others as you would have done to you.

Be Polite.

Be considerate.

In other words, act like your mother is watching you.

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rlpp
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Posted: 14 March 2007 at 1:38am | IP Logged
10-4.... Good Post!
SwampNut
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Posted: 14 March 2007 at 5:07am | IP Logged
Learn to back up before you get to the ramp...

And when someone politely offers to help, don't act like an ass because you're too proud to admit defeat.

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jceria
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Asking for "common sense?" That's a lot to ask for!
SwampNut
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 1:11pm | IP Logged
Is it unreasonable to expect your sailboat neighbors to tie up their cables or whatever they need to do so you don't have to listen to them clang all night?  Seriously, is it considered acceptable to make that much noise all night?  I noticed only some sailboats did it.

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Dream 'Inn
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 1:34pm | IP Logged

SwampNut wrote:
Is it unreasonable to expect your sailboat neighbors to tie up their cables or whatever they need to do so you don't have to listen to them clang all night?  Seriously, is it considered acceptable to make that much noise all night?  I noticed only some sailboats did it.

 

I hear what you are saying swamp, but it seems like I always here them clang on windy nights...not knowing much about sailboats, I'm guessing there isn't much they can do.

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lanbuilder
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 1:51pm | IP Logged
As an ex sailboater I can assure you it is really easy to stop the halliards clanging.  You just hook a small shock cord between the halliard ( the wire that hauls up the sails) and a stay (the wire that holds up the mast) or some other fixed point on the boat, and apply enough tension to keep the halliard away from the mast. 
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 2:01pm | IP Logged
I keep my boat among sailboats in my marina.  Whenever the rigging starts clanging in the wind I board my neighbor's sailboats and tie off whatever is clanging.

Virtually all of the more seasoned sailors in my marina know how to do it right.

I figure that by boarding and tying off errant gear, I am doing them a favor by extending the life of their gear that would otherwise be beaten against the mast.




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SwampNut
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 3:54pm | IP Logged
I noticed that one boat was the worst (the closest, just our luck) and only two others were making any noise.  The rest were silent, so it's not impossible to do.

I looked in the morning and noticed lots of scrape marks and discoloration on the mast and cables that were rubbing.  Doesn't look like a good thing for the boat.

Though it's probably the right thing to do, I'm extremely uneasy about stepping aboard anyone's boat uninvited.

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MichaelNJ
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 4:07pm | IP Logged

My Marina Contract requires sailboats to secure their halliards.

Question for Presentation:

Turn your VHF radio to LOW power so if you make a call when close to other boats you do not damage other boaterís radios.

How would you cause damage by not switching to Low power?


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gohoney2003
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 9:52pm | IP Logged

I would add one clarification on the helping others dock....ask first, if help is needed. 

I've had more problems from dock boys and dock neighbors surprising me, by grabbing a dock line tied off one of my cleats, and pulling the bow or stern off line when I  was docking just fine.  Next thing I know I'm forced to conteract their "help". 

Just be there to offer to lend assisitance, only if the Capt. truely needs it.

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BluesBarge
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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 10:39pm | IP Logged
Tying halliards is a common courtesy expected of sailboats.  Says so in the Chapman's guide to boating etiquette.  I've got it.  Want me to read to you guys?

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Posted: 15 March 2007 at 11:39pm | IP Logged
jceria wrote:
Asking for "common sense?" That's a lot to ask for!  


Why is common sense not so common?

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Dusty Rhoads
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Posted: 16 March 2007 at 5:03am | IP Logged
Michael:  I think that there is a thought in the radio world that too much power too close can cause a power back to rec. radio that will blow the finals in the radio. I don't think this is true, on a routine basis, cause how many folks think about switching to low power other than bridge openings etc.
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T3RockHall
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Posted: 16 March 2007 at 8:22am | IP Logged
Dusty Rhoads wrote:
Michael:  I think that there is a thought in the radio world that too much power too close can cause a power back to rec. radio that will blow the finals in the radio. I don't think this is true, on a routine basis, cause how many folks think about switching to low power other than bridge openings etc.  


"Finals" are on the transmitting end. You might overload the "front end" of nearby radio causing distortion, but you won't damage it with 25 Watts.

I always keep my radio on LOW power anyway; the line-of-sight distance is the same on either power setting. If I can't get through on 1 W, then I'll switch to higher power to make my signal stronger at the other end. Only rarely is a Watt insufficient to make contact.
MichaelNJ
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Posted: 16 March 2007 at 10:51am | IP Logged
Thanks for the clarification.  I think most radios default to low for channel 13, bridge to bridge communications.  But when hailing on 16 at 25 watts, looking for a boat that is far away, boats that are close to you will receive that transmission at high power even though they are not the intended recipient.

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rwidman
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T3RockHall wrote:
........."Finals" are on the transmitting end. You might overload the "front end" of nearby radio causing distortion, but you won't damage it with 25 Watts.
 

Correct.  Although we used to blow the AM radios in our work trucks back in the 70s when we forgot to turn them off before using our two way radios.  The antennas were about three feet apart and I think the two way was much more than 25 watts.

Ron
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rwidman
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 7:31pm | IP Logged

- Keep music / TV volume at a reasonable level. Sound travels very well over the water. Keep this in mind when talking too.  

And if you have a generator, don't use it at the marina.

Ron
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TN Freebird
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 8:20pm | IP Logged

I would certainly hope everyone would already know what was listed as proper if you have ever docked a boat in a marina.  I'm sure we've all seen boaters who would see many of the valid points listed as foreign to them.  I just love sitting at idle holding my position outside a fuel dock while some guy in a pontoon boat eats the chips he just bought at the store while still tied to the dock. 

I would certainly agree with everything which was listed, and while there is certainly nothing wrong with switching to low power transmit of a VHF, I have never heard of that being done to prevent damage to another VHF close by.

Sorry to question that as it really has nothing to do with properly docking your boat and being polite to those around you.  But there is no way to damage anyone's VHF by using full wattage.

How many of you have more than one VHF on your own boat?  Do you switch one off when you are transmitting from the other and using full power?  I certainly don't, and I've never heard of anyone else doing it either.

Outside of that, I would have a hard time understanding any circumstance which would lead someone to run their generator while docked at a marina.  When I am in a marina it generally means I am staying there to avoid running my generator.

Now if I just pull into a marina long enough to visit a restaurant or get supplies, I'll keep my generator running for the duration of that stay.  Certainly nothing wrong with that.

Not trying to be picky, but we may as well get those parts cleared up.

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rwidman
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 8:41pm | IP Logged
TN Freebird wrote:

.......  I just love sitting at idle holding my position outside a fuel dock while some guy in a pontoon boat eats the chips he just bought at the store while still tied to the dock. ............

 

He's letting his blower run for the recommended four minutes before restarting his engine. 

Ron
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TN Freebird
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 9:14pm | IP Logged
Nah, his wife was drinking a beer and helping him eat the chips!
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PascalG
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 9:30pm | IP Logged
"Now if I just pull into a marina long enough to visit a restaurant or get supplies, I'll keep my generator running for the duration of that stay.  Certainly nothing wrong with that."

nothing wrong with that ???  CO getting trapped against a dock and drifting onto the next boat ?  nothign wrong with that ??
mikey4241
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 11:48pm | IP Logged
Nice post Present--add in a line about the sailboters with their flapping halyards and I think you've covered most of it--too bad that teaching common sense is akin to legislating morality or stupidity!!! 
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Carl Guzman
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Posted: 17 March 2007 at 11:54pm | IP Logged

Well that all depends I would not turn the genny off if I'm just stoping for 5-10 minutes to go in to a store for snacks or drinks...

But if I'm docking for dinner it would have to be a case by case. I'd have to look around me to see how tite it is and ventalation and a close look at nieghbors. I mean If I got food or fish in the fridge I don't want to turn it off too long , also the ice gets all stuck together Safty is always first but most times the CO has plenty of space to escape..

And a Inverter is not going to handel a full side by side two more freezers a bar fridge and another ice maker..

 

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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 8:40am | IP Logged

Most everyone runs the gen when staying for a short time for lunch or visiting. As Carl said there are multiple things that need to be running. In the south AC is a neccessity. Last Memorial day with temps around 90, the whole area we were staying lost power. There were about 12 gens running that stayed on for 15 hours. I had a full boat with 3 A/C units running as well as everything else. You could barely hear the noise of the gen over the a/c fan blowing. NO ONE COMPLAINED or cared. In fact everyone was greatful to have power.

Ever see any megayachts? they NEVER shutdown the gens.

Of course some people like to sleep in a pool of sweat. Not anyone I know!

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Our boat has a "50250 volt system". Up where we boat, there are a lot of marinas that only have 30 amp 120 volt power. Unless you can find the split phase on the dock plug ins to get 240 volts, you are out of luck for power. So we have to run the generator periodically.

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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 9:19am | IP Logged

PascalG wrote:
"Now if I just pull into a marina long enough to visit a restaurant or get supplies, I'll keep my generator running for the duration of that stay.  Certainly nothing wrong with that."

nothing wrong with that ???  CO getting trapped against a dock and drifting onto the next boat ?  nothign wrong with that ??
 
CO trapped against a dock?

I've never seen a dock with four walls, a roof, and a garage door.

Have you ever had any one rafted up on either side of you while on the hook Pascal?  I do it all the time in TN with 10 or more boats, all running their generators,  ALL NIGHT LONG!!!

I KNOW, LET'S MAKE THIS THREAD ABOUT PEOPLE WHO DO NOT HAVE CO MONITORS ON THEIR BOATS!!!!

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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 9:33am | IP Logged

Bird:

Glad to see you back. Why bother with a guy who is just trying to bait you and get your goat - he wins if you lower youself to his level good buddy.

Bill

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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 9:55am | IP Logged
TN Freebird wrote:

 CO trapped against a dock?

I've never seen a dock with four walls, a roof, and a garage door.

 

My boat came with an owner's manual and I read it. 

The manual had several cautions on CO poisoning and showed examples of how this can happen.  One example showed exhaust gasses accumulating at a dock and entering the boat.  In calm winds this could easily happen.

Edited by rwidman on 18 March 2007 at 10:04am
Ron
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rwidman
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:01am | IP Logged
captddis wrote:

....... In the south AC is a neccessity. ...........  

A  neccessity ?  What do the poor folks do?  What did everyone do fifty years ago?  How about people who must work outdoors in the summer?  Roofers?  Road crews? Landscapers?

Food, oxygen and water are necessities, AC is not.

Edited by rwidman on 18 March 2007 at 10:03am
Ron
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captddis
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:02am | IP Logged
We all have diesel generators and the CO risk is much less.
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:26am | IP Logged
rwidman wrote:
captddis wrote:

....... In the south AC is a neccessity. ...........  

A  neccessity ?  What do the poor folks do?  What did everyone do fifty years ago?  How about people who must work outdoors in the summer?  Roofers?  Road crews? Landscapers?

Food, oxygen and water are necessities, AC is not.

 

I don't think Dave was talking about trying to air condition the entire South, do you?

You probably don't overnite on your Glastron in Charleston during the summer.  Folks who invest small fortunes in big boats do it because they enjoy being comfortable on the water especially when overnighting for days, weeks, or even months at a time.

Would you pay good money to take a cruise on a ship with no AC?  Heck, would you pay $19.95 to spend the night in a Notel 69 without AC?

Kinda silly for you to have made that jab in this context, don't you think?

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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:28am | IP Logged
rwidman wrote:
TN Freebird wrote:

 CO trapped against a dock?

I've never seen a dock with four walls, a roof, and a garage door.

 

My boat came with an owner's manual and I read it. 

The manual had several cautions on CO poisoning and showed examples of how this can happen.  One example showed exhaust gasses accumulating at a dock and entering the boat.  In calm winds this could easily happen.

 
Are you referring to the owner's manual which came with the generator on your boat?
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rwidman
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:36am | IP Logged

TN Freebird Are you referring to the owner's manual which came with the generator on your boat?[/QUOTE wrote:

Nope, the boat's owners manual.

 

Nope, the boat's owners manual.

Ron
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rwidman
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:39am | IP Logged
TN Freebird

.............You probably don't overnite on your Glastron in Charleston during the summer.  ........[/QUOTE wrote:

Actually, I do.  The water temperature helps to keep the cabin cool and I open the vents.  There's usually a  

Actually, I do.  The water temperature helps to keep the cabin cool and I open the vents.  There's usually a breeze blowing.  And we don't wear much clothing while sleeping.

Ron
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captddis
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:39am | IP Logged

A guess being comfortable is not important to some people. I like to stay on my boat for weeks at a time.  The reason I work hard is so I can do the things I like AND be comfortable. IF you want to ride around in a boat with no amenities your choice.

Do not criticize my choice, If you admit the truth you would rather be in the a/c also.  Yes , people got by without electricity, running water, medicine, heat etc. I have NEVER met anyone who wanted to go back.

As a side note, My brother has a permanently installed generator at his house. During and after Wilma his gen ran for 10 days. NO ONE complained, instead they stayed at his house and soaked up the a/c, hot water and refrigerated food.

The biggest whiners are also the most envious. Live and let live.

pop-pop
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 10:53am | IP Logged
captddis said "I have NEVER met anyone who wanted to go back." I would love to go back to the 50s and early 60s life was much slower and better back then.
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TN Freebird
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 11:05am | IP Logged
rwidman wrote:

[QUOTE=TN Freebird Are you referring to the owner's manual which came with the generator on your boat?  

Nope, the boat's owners manual.

Yep!

It was obvious you did not have a generator on your boat, and I was just trying to make a point.

Look guys, people like Dave, Carl, Bill, myself and others are not trying to be condescending to those who have smaller boats which are also very enjoyable when used as they were designed to be used.

We just happen to do most of our boating on larger boats, that's all.  Yes, we all have experience running smaller boats, but many of you have none in running larger ones.  Nothing good or bad about that, it's just a fact.

With that being said, would any of you drive the new Monte Carlo you just purchased from the local Chevy dealer to Daytona and tell Dale Earnhardt, Jr. how he could learn anything from you?

Can we please have a little less heckling on subjects where boat size is an issue?  Do guys like us just need to pretend we own nothing but smaller boats in order to fit in as boaters who enjoy hanging out with fellow boaters, no matter how large their boat may be or who the manufacturer was?

Edited by TN Freebird on 18 March 2007 at 11:08am
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Posted: 18 March 2007 at 11:13am | IP Logged

pop-pop wrote:
captddis said "I have NEVER met anyone who wanted to go back." I would love to go back to the 50s and early 60s life was much slower and better back then.
 
I'm 49 years old, but I would LOVE to go back to when Americans all stuck together, didn't need welfare programs, most still believed in God, prayer was still allowed in school, and most everybody spoke English or at least made an effort to when they moved here.

I would be more than happy to have a sailboat if I could in fact go back to that time.  I'll bet I'm not the only one who feels that way and would think even a certain imported member may feel the same way.

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